“Burn. Kill. Destroy.” : Harsh Realities of a School Shooting

Nikolas Cruz was a 19 year old student at Parkland High School. He gunned down the facility on February 14, 2018, which resulted in 17 students dead and 17 others injured. Police released his interrogation on August 10th, debuting ten hours of Nikolas beating and screaming at himself. Cruz was showcased shouting obscene statements including “Burn. Kill. Destroy.”, as well as telling the officer a demon was in his head. Cruz’s behavior presents the mind of an unhinged serial killer.

The same deranged mind which caused Cruz to kill his fellow students could be the alike mind of one of your classmates. Statistics have shown in the year 2018 alone there have been 23 school shootings that have resulted in casualties. That averages at one school shooting per week. Do not let your school become another number in that statistic. Your community has the potential to make a difference by starting the right conversation.

The wrong conversations brought along by a tragedy takes the focus away from the priority. Debates about gun control separates a community in the most desperate of times, rather than bringing them together. Instead of putting opinions on the front line, focusing on preventative measures would allow victims and survivors to feel at home again. Tragedy does not show favoritism, horrific acts can happen anywhere at any time, even in the most unexpected places.

Believing that something as traumatic as this will not happen in your hometown makes your district a part of the problem. Instead of asking a student to sit with your friends at lunch, genuinely be a part of the potential solution by considering them a friend. Mental health, isolation, and a bad home life can greatly impact a student’s behavior at school. Nikolas Cruz is an example of a demented individual who possibly did not receive proper help. Circumstances can lead someone to do the unimaginable. Cruz allegedly stated his horrendous act was preventable. Whether true or not, become the change. Actions as simple as looking for signs of depleting sanity and watching for changes in emotional stability can enable you to address the problem sooner.